How to remove a broken bolt in a deep hole | remove broken bolt in recessed hole



It can be difficult removing a broken bolt or stud that is recessed in a deep hole as there are not many techniques to remove the bolts. Before attempting to remove any bolt, it is a good idea to shock the bolt first, then apply some heat and finally some spray penetrant (once it is cool). Drilling out the bolt is one of the few options that will work in this scenario. In this video I show two techniques that could potentially work when a bolt is broken in a deep hole or a bolt is sheared in an aluminium component.

Some more videos that might be of interest are-

How to remove a rounded Allen head bolt- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDOWPekMX44
How to remove a stripped screw- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mTFQbaT3Zc
How to remove a broken bolt- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_R1b8niX13w
How to remove a rounded nut or bolt- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5d0Bgvjmlk
Screw extractors | Easyouts – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMrDYJvY0Ts
Removing a broken bolt using a welder- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRrz-cphBY4
Remove a broken bolt using a left handed drill bit- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYvaPbX1sT4

How to make the bolt drill guide can be seen here- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mZj0J6CNYA

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39 thoughts on “How to remove a broken bolt in a deep hole | remove broken bolt in recessed hole

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    The correct method using a screw extractor or some call it "easy out" is to place the adjustable wrench on the square tang, lightly hammer the extractor at the same time unscrew the extractor. the fasteners are all metric so I guess the screws broke in some Japanese equipment. It is not necessary to lube the drill bit because it should not overheat with low rpm and you want it to hopefully have enough friction to unscrew the broken stud (screw). Never use nickel based anti-sieze on aluminum or magnesium threaded holes and also never use stainless fasteners on magnesium . I'm reminded of the time I observed a guy over-torque a screw breaking the head off so to avoid a ton of paperwork with the NRC (this was at the San Onofre nuclear power plant) he applied super glue to attach the broken head onto the screw stud and nobody would be the wiser.

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    A highly-skilled and experienced teacher – patient, professional and responsive to Q's. I do like his technique of repeating crucial elements, like being careful to not drill through the screw into the aluminum pan! What a thrill to see the broken bolt extracted. Almost 8mil views – I'm not surprised – a tribute.

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    Sorry, I don’t mean to be rude but what did you say at 3:37? Also, is it suggested to use an impact drill for this or will a regular one work?

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    i used my MIG welder and stacked welds on the broken bolt until it was out enough to grab with locking pliers. then i discovered ANOTHER broken bolt beneath that one.got them both with a MIG welder. be careful not to let the wire and puddle go into the threads.quick on the trigger, you dont want a puddle, just stack blobs of weld on each other. i did not damage any threads in my removal.

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    great ideas always start with sharp bits made to cut through the material you are removing! and if you break a hardened screw extractor off in the bolt you will need to use a mill bit to drill that out.

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    Thanks very much, I enjoyed it very well it's a clever idea, but some times the hole or the broken bolt are very damaged, I use the welding spot way to extract it…

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    You haven't lived until you've snapped off an EZ out in a broken stud. THEN you have a problem.

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    9 times out of 10 when a bolt head breaks from the bolt itself its because it is galled or seized in the hole . its not because the head was weak and now you just need to grab the threaded part ( all of your examples) The bolt is usually broken FLUSH with the surface so those fancy centering bolts arent worth a shit either. But as a machinist these are all tricks your avg. Joe tries before I get it and put it in the Milling machine to get out that now chowdered to hell bolt with messed up threads . I wish it was as easy as you make it out . not slamming you or your vid , I just deal in reality.

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    Set your driller in speed 1 and on screw position so you can limit the power in case it bite to hard without warning.

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    Fantastic what a great idea using a bolt with the center drilled out, retired – auto mechanic sure wish I knew that years ago, can't tell you how many bolts I snapped of and had a hell of a time removing them the drill would always walk off center, brilliant

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    The examples you show are not the result of seized threads, but of over-tightening. Otherwise, you would have had a much more difficult time extracting the remains. Please do the real mechanics of the world a kind favor and slap the p!ss out of the ham-fisted bloke (or blokes) who didn't know when to stop tightening those fasteners.

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    I've never had to use a hinge bit, or made custom banjo style Bolts with holes in them to drill… That spring loaded punch would of been just fine for punching the center of that bolt for an indentation in the bolt to start drilling… just my $0.02 USD

  • August 9, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    Allow me to tell you about a nightmare. My son bought a salvaged LQ engine. Several of the exhaust manifold bolts were sheared. First he tried welding a nut to a broken bolt. Next he tried to remove one with a hardened tapered extractor… it snapped, leaving about 1/2" (12mm) in the bolt. We tried to drill out the extractor with a carbide bit… it snapped, leaving about 3/8" (9mm) inside. I ordered some hollow diamond grit bits, the type used for drilling holes in glass and ceramic tile. Slowly, patiently, I drilled (maybe ground is more accurate) a hole through it all… carbide, hardened tool steel, and hardened bolt… while my son kept a steady stream of CRC Freeze-Off to remove heat and swarf. Took about 40 minutes to drill out the body of the bolt, leaving just its threads barely connected together. Had to pick the bolt threads out with a dental pick, but got them out without damaging the hole threads.
    Tried the nut weld on the remaining 3. Only one worked. The rest, we went straight to drill-out with the diamond coring bits, about 20 mins each but terrific results, all threads 100% undamaged.

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